Type-3 Diabetes May Be Misdiagnosed As Type 2: Diabetes Management Gets Easier By Making Smart Food Choices

If you happen to be suffering from diabetes, making informed and smart food choices is a must.

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Type-3 Diabetes May Be Misdiagnosed As Type 2: Diabetes Management Gets Easier By Making Smart Food Choices

Highlights

  1. Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder
  2. The condition is characterized by high blood sugar levels
  3. Experts now signal at the existence of a new type of diabetes
Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar levels for a long period of time. A diabetic is either not able to produce enough insulin or is not able to use the insulin produced to meet the body's requirement. Type 1 and 2 are the commonly diagnosed forms of diabetes. Gestational diabetes is another type associated with pregnancy wherein a woman's blood sugar levels sees a significant spike. Reportedly, experts now signal at the existence of a new type of diabetes - Type 3c - which is largely believed to be misdiagnosed as Type 2.

Though the American Diabetes Association does not mention Type 3c diabetes anywhere on the official website, the condition is often associated with Alzheimer's disease as a result of insulin resistance in the brain. Type 3c diabetes has also been described as Pancreatogenic diabetes caused by a host of factors including pancreatic disease, pancreatic resection, exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis among others. While Type 3c diabetes has been widely applied in alternative healthcare sectors, it has still not been studied thoroughly by the medical community.

Living with diabetes: Food choices

If you happen to be suffering from diabetes, making informed and smart food choices is a must. "There are many foods rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber that you can add to your daily eating plan. Some of these would include non-starchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains," as mentioned on the official American Diabetes Association (ADA) website. As per the ADA guidelines, it is safe to include the following items in your diet.

- Low-fat milk and curd

- Whole grains

- Nuts

- Essential fatty acids (omega 3 and 6)

- Tomatoes

- Berries

- Sweet potatoes

- Dark leafy veggies

- Beans

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