Students, Beware! Binge Drinking in College May Lower Job Prospects Later

According to the study, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, heavy drinking or to be more precise drinking at least six times a month could lower the chances for a fresh college graduate to land a job by 10 per cent. Sounds strange? Read this

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Students, Beware! Binge Drinking in College May Lower Job Prospects Later

Highlights

  1. Binge drinking may lower the chances of job prospects
  2. We are all aware of the hazardous effects of binge drinking
  3. Binge drinking may turn out to be fatal
According to the study, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, heavy drinking or to be more precise drinking at least six times a month could lower the chances for a fresh college graduate to land a job by 10 per cent. Sounds strange? Here's what the team has discovered. "The manner in which students drink appears to be more influential than how much they drink when it comes to predicting the likelihood of getting a job upon graduation," said study co-author Peter Bamberger of Tel Aviv University in Israel.

The research revealed that a non-binge pattern of drinking does not adversely impact job search results until their drinking reaches binge levels. Data for the study was provided by over 827 individuals who graduated in the years 2014, 2015, and 2016 from Cornell University, the University of Washington, the University of Florida, and the University of Michigan in the United States.

"A student who binge-drinks at least four times a month has a six percent lower probability of finding a job than a student who does not engage in similar drinking habits. Those students who drank heavily six times a month increased their unemployment probability to 10 percent," Bamberger said. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the United States, "binge-drinking" is defined as drinking four or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a woman and five or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a man.

Previous studies have also warned about the hazardous effects of binge drinking among teens. According to a US based study, people who binge-drink in their teens are more likely to die prematurely than people who don't drink excessively or at least avoid getting drunk until they are older. 

With Inputs from IANS


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