Amid Doklam Standoff, Chinese President Says Can Beat 'Invading Enemies'

"I firmly believe that our gallant military has both confidence and ability to defeat all invading enemies," said President Xi Jinping as he inspected a massive military parade today.

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Amid Doklam Standoff, Chinese President Says Can Beat 'Invading Enemies'

China's President Xi Jinping inspects PLA soldiers at a barracks in Hong Kong on June 30 (File Photo)

New Delhi: 

Highlights

  1. Indian, Chinese troops locked in a standoff in Doklam
  2. Beijing accused India of sending troops to what it says as its territory
  3. India has said its troops are on Bhutanese soil and not on Chinese turf
Chinese President Xi Jinping today said the Chinese army has the "confidence and ability" to defeat all "invading enemies" - a statement that comes in the backdrop of the heightened tensions over the border standoff near Sikkim.

Beijing had accused India of sending troops into what it claims as its territory and has repeated that India must "unconditionally" withdraws troops if it wants to hold talks on how to end the nearly six-week long confrontation. India has said its troops are on Bhutanese soil and not on Chinese turf.

"I firmly believe that our gallant military has both confidence and ability to defeat all invading enemies," said President Xi as he inspected a massive military parade today. The comment from the President -- who heads the Central Military Commission which commands the People's Liberation Army -- is seen to reinforce the belligerent stand of the state-run media. The Indian foreign ministry is yet to comment.

Last week, the Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said senior Indian officials have "admitted" to entering Chinese territory. Without naming any official, Mr Yi said India should "conscientiously withdraw" its troops from the area that China calls Donglang and claims as its territory, but which India and Bhutan call Doklam and consider part of the tiny Himalayan kingdom.

Indian troops had gone to the area to block a Chinese road building operation. New Delhi had told Beijing that the road, which overlooked "Chicken's Neck" -- a narrow strip of land connecting India to its northeastern states -- comprised a security threat.

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While Foreign minister Sushma Swaraj said both sides should pull back soldiers and engage in talks, China has flatly refused to do so.


Last week, National Security advisor Ajit Doval went to China for a summit of security officials of BRICS - a grouping of Brazil, Russia, China, India and South Africa. But it is not known whether the border standoff was discussed at the bilateral with President Xi held on its sidelines.

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