Study Links Regular Mango Consumption with Heart Disease and Diabetes Prevention: Here's What You Must Know

Some of the previous studies had also established a link between regular mango consumption and blood sugar levels.

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Study Links Regular Mango Consumption with Heart Disease and Diabetes Prevention: Here's What You Must Know

Highlights

  1. The king of fruits is one of the most delicious and juiciest fruits
  2. Many keep a check on mango consumption owing to its high sugar content
  3. Some of the previous studies established a link between mango consumption
Love mangoes? We all do. The king of fruits is one of the most delicious and juiciest fruits that come in many varieties to appease the palate and delight our taste buds. Despite its spellbinding flavour, versatility in the culinary space and a bevy of health benefits, many like to keep a check on mango consumption owing to its high sugar content. A recent study funded by the US-based National Mango Board suggests that regular consumption of mangoes can help reduce cholesterol and curb blood sugar levels; however experts seem to stand divided on this piece of information.

Some of the previous studies do seem to have established a link between regular mango consumption and blood sugar levels. A paper published by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) noted that eating mangoes may help in controlling blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association includes mangoes in its list of fruits that are safe to be consumed by diabetics. However, other experts like to take the above mentioned facts with a pinch of salt. "I never say no to anything. The only element present in mangoes that is bad for diabetics is sugar. If you have high sugar levels, you must steer clear of mangoes, however, borderline cases of diabetes can enjoy a small slice of the fruit once in a while," noted a Bangalore-based nutritionist, Dr. Anju Sood.

"A large serving of mango or any other fruit will raise your blood sugar levels more substantially than a small serving. So, it is better to eat mangoes in small quantities," noted Dietitian Jasleen Kaur, Just Diet Clinic in New Delhi.

"According to various studies, around 30% of the sugar content in mango is fruit sugar fructose which is metabolized in the liver and may lead to raised triglyceride levels. This is why mangoes were traditionally excluded from a diabetic's diet. Abstinence is not the answer, portion control is," shared Dr. Sanjay Kalra, Consultant Endocrinologist at Bharti Hospital, Karnal.

While the medical fraternity stands divided on mangoes' ability to promote heart health and in diabetes management, it is suggested that you get in touch with your healthcare expert to understand if regular mango consumption would benefit your health or may meddle with any ongoing health condition.

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