An Experimental Patch That Delivers A High Dose of Peanut Protein May Reduce Allergic Reactions

Peanut allergies are on the rise, and are the most common cause of severe and fatal food reactions

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An Experimental Patch That Delivers A High Dose of Peanut Protein May Reduce Allergic Reactions
According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), an experimental patch that delivers a high dose of peanut protein has shown promise in reducing allergic reactions in children and adults. According to the reports, about two percent of US children are allergic to peanuts and must avoid them altogether. Peanut allergies are on the rise, and are the most common cause of severe and fatal food reactions in the United States, as per the researchers.

The study had 221 children and adults allergic to peanuts enrolled. These participants were randomly assigned to three groups, each of which wore a peanut skin patch in different doses. There was a fourth group that was given a placebo. The trial, known as phase two, was designed to test which does was best, and how well it would work over a year.

As a result, the highest dose tested, 250 micrograms, was comparatively most effective, and also appeared to help half the patients who wore it. The placebo patch helped one-quarter of wearers. Patients were considered responders if they took without incident either 1000 milligram or more of peanut protein. The researchers however claimed that that sample size of each treatment group was relatively small.

In January this year, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) had urged the parents to feed babies peanut-containing foods beginning at the age of four months to five years.

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