7-Foot-Long Python Rescued From Air Force Station In Delhi

The snake is currently under observation and will be released back into its natural habitat, once deemed fit

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7-Foot-Long Python Rescued From Air Force Station In Delhi

The python was spotted outside the mess building of the Air Force Station in Tughlakabad


New Delhi:  A seven-foot-long Indian rock python was rescued by the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit from the Air Force Station in Tughlakabad on Wednesday. The snake is currently under observation and will be released back into its natural habitat, once deemed fit, the NGO said.

An emergency call on the Wildlife SOS 24-hour helpline number by Air Force officials alerted the organisation's Rapid Response Unit to the presence of a python outside the mess building. A rescue team comprising two snake handlers from the NGO promptly arrived at the location and successfully carried out the rescue operation.

Growing habitat destruction and encroachment is rapidly blurring the lines between cities and forests. Consequently, the wildlife living in proximity to such expanding areas have no choice but to forage or seek shelter in urban habitats.

Most snakes are burrowing reptiles and they spend most of their time underground but during monsoons their homes get destroyed due to flooding and they are forced to venture into human habitations, in search of prey like rodents and lizards, Wildlife SOS said in a statement.

A member of the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response team said, "We get maximum calls for reptile rescues in the monsoon season. In the past month we have responded to nearly 100 distress calls pertaining to snakes and monitor lizards in Delhi NCR".

Kartick Satyanarayan, co-founder, Wildlife SOS, said, "We are very glad that people have become so aware that they consider calling experts instead of trying to deal with the matter themselves, or worse, resorting to killing the snakes.

"In case people come across any reptiles or wild animals around their vicinity, we request them to immediately call our 24 hour rescue helpline (9871963535) for assistance," he said.
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