PM Narendra Modi Inaugurates Raisina Dialogue In Delhi: Highlights

PM Narendra Modi has inaugurated the Raisina Dialogue.

New Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi today told 69 nations participating in the flagship geo-political conference "Raisina Dialogue" that reform would not be enough "unless it transforms economy and society". Pointing out that he had got a "mandate to take bold decisions", he said for his government, this means a "path of international engagement" -- focussed on "restoring bridges, shaping relationships, making India human resource to be reckoned with". More than 250 representatives of 65 nations are participating in the second Raisina Dialogue. With a theme of "New Normal: Multi-lateralism with Multi-Polarity", the meet is focussing on deliberate on strategic issues including new challenges and cyber security. 

Here are the highlights of PM Modi's address:
  • Today seems to be a day of speeches. Just a while ago we watched President Xi and (UK) PM (Theresa) May speak. Perhaps, an overdose for the intellectuals present here.
  • It is a great privilege to speak to you.
  • Excellency Karzai, PM Harper, PM Kevin Rudd.. It is a pleasure to see you in Delhi.
  • A warm welcome to all the guests. Over the next couple of days, you would debate the world's conflicts and risks; its success and opportunities; its past behaviour and likely, prognosis and new norms.
  • In May 2014, people of India also ushered in a new normal.
  • My fellow Indians spoke in one voice to entrust my govt with a mandate for change, not just a change of attitude but mindset, a  change to take bold decisions.
  • A mandate in which reforms transforms economy and society.
  • A transformation that is embedded in the aspirations and optimism of India's youth and energy of its millions.
  • Economic growth, welfare for farmers, employment opportunities for youth and security of our nation. All of them are deeply impacted by development of the world. But the reverse is also true.
  • The world needs India's sustained rise as much as India needs the world.
  • It is therefore, only natural that India's choices at home and international priorities form a seamless continuity.
  • For multiple reasons, and levels the world is going through profound changes.
  • Globally connected societies, digital opportunities, technological shifts, knowledge boom and innovation are leading the march of humanity
  • But sluggish growth and economic volatility are also a sobering fact
  • Physical borders may be less relevant in this age but walls within nations are sentiment against trade and migration and rising parochial attitudes across the globe are in stark evidence
  • Violence, terrorism and extremism continue to proliferate in various directions.
  • The political and military power are diffused and distributed.
  • Multi-polarity of the world and a multi-polar Asia is a dominant fact today and we welcome it because it captures the reality of the rise of many nations.
  • It accepts the voices of many, not views of a few.
  • The crucial question is how do nations act in a situation where the frames of reference are shifting rapidly.
  • Our choices and actions are based on the strength of our power.
  • Our strategic power is based on realism, co-existence, cooperation and partnership.
  • For our government this means rebuilding connectivity and restoring bridges and rejoining India, shaping relationships, making India a human resource to be reckoned with by connecting our talented youth to global needs and opportunities.
  • Transformation encompasses out global agenda. For me 'Sabka Saath Sabka Vikas' is not just a vision for India, but a belief for the entire world. It encompassed multiple themes and geographies.
  • The people of South Asia are shared with blood and history.
  • A thriving well-connected, interconnected neighbourhood is my dream.
  • We have partnered with all our neighbours. The results of our efforts are there to see.
  • In Afghanistan, despite difficulties, our partnership assists in building institutions.
  • Our security engagement has risen.
  • With Bangladesh, we have achieved greater convergence and political understanding and significantly, the Land and Maritime Boundaries
  • In Bhutan, our overall engagement in energy and stability is key.
  • That vision had led us to invite SAARC leaders including Pakistan for my swearing in.
  • I also travelled to Lahore but India alone cannot walk the path of peace.
  • Pakistan has to walk away from terror if it wants talks with India.
  • Our engagement with SE Asia is key to our Act East policy.
    Our partnership with ASEAN and its members have served to enhance commerce, tech, investment, security partnership with the region.
  • In our engagement with China, as Xi and I agreed, we sought to tap vast area of commercial activities in the relationship. I see development of India and China as an unprecedented opportunity for our two countries and the world.
  • At the same time, it is not unnatural for two large neighbouring partners to have differences. Both our countries need to show sensitivity and respect for each others core concerns and interests.
  • Prevailing wisdom tells us that this century belongs to Asia.
  • Over the past 2.5 years, we have given a huge momentum to our relationship with US, Japan and other powers. We share a desire to cooperate in converging views and opportunities and challenges that face us.
  • There are large pools of prosperity spread across this region.
  • But rising ambition and rivalries are visible stress points. The security architecture in the region should be open, balanced and inclusive.
  • In my conversation with (US President-elect Donald) Trump, we agreed to keep building on gains in our partnership.
  • Russia is an abiding friend. (Russian President Vladimir) Putin and I have held long talks on the challenges that confront the world today. Our partnership in defence has deepened. The emphasis on energy and trade have shown results.
  • We enjoy a truly strategic partnership with Japan.
  • With Europe, we have a vision of partnership in the field of knowledge industries
  • With our brothers and sisters of Africa we have built meaningful development and partnerships. Today, the footprint of our development strategies all across the globe. India has a long history to be a maritime nation.
  • We also believe that primary responsibility for peace and security in the Indian Ocean lies with those live in this region. Ours is not an exclusive approach.
  • We appreciate the compelling logic of regional connectivity for peace and prosperity. Through our actions we have sought to overcome barriers to our outreach to West and Central Asia.
  • Examples of these are tripartite agreements with Afghanistan and Iran on Chabahar.
  • Due to our traditions, we have shouldered the burden of our commitments. We have laid assistance and relief in times of trouble - the Nepal earthquake, humanitarian efforts in Maldives and Fiji.
  • We have increased collaboration in coastal surveillance and fighting threats like organised crime and piracy and  smuggling.
  • We have delinked religion from terror.
  • Those neighbours who support and export terror are ignored.
  • We have an ambitious agenda and aggressive goal to generate 100 gigawatts of renewable energy.