Nag Panchami 2017: Why Do People Offer Milk To Snakes On Nag Panchami

The auspicious day falls on the fifth day of the bright fortnight of the lunar day in the month of Shravan.

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Nag Panchami 2017: Why Do People Offer Milk To Snakes On Nag Panchami

'Nag' means snake, and the festival is dedicated to the worship of snakes

Hindus across the country are celebrating Nag Panchami today. In Hindi and Sanskrit, 'Nag' means snake, and the festival is dedicated to the worship of snakes. Snakes have an immense significance in Hindu belief. The auspicious day falls on the fifth day of the bright fortnight of the lunar day in the month of Shravan, according to the Hindu calendar. The holy month of Shravan particularly holds a lot of significance for a Shiv devotee. The month is dedicated to the worship of Lord Shiva, and because snakes hold such a special place in Lord Shiva's life, this day too becomes extra special for the devotees. The festival is celebrated by worshiping snakes by offering milk, rice and flowers in return for blessings. The Hindu festival is celebrated in several parts of India. In Ujjain, the Nagchandreshwar Mahadev in the Mahakaleshwar Mandir opens its door for the devotees, where the followers pour in since early in the morning with their set of offerings.

Significance of the festival and offering milk

Snakes occupy a very significant place in Hindu Mythology. Considered to be the resident of Nag Loka, snakes on Nag Panchami are worshiped for the protection of the family from evil energies. Number of myths and legends are associated with the festival.

One of the myth states that a deadly snake Kalia had been poisoning the river Yamuna making it difficult for the brijwasis (residents of Brij, Uttar Pradesh) to drink water. Krishna (an avatar of Vishnu) then takes down Kalia and defeats him. Kalia is forced to take back all the poison from the river, and in return Lord Krishna blesses him saying whosoever will offer milk and prayers to the snakes on this day (Nag Panchami) would be relieved of all his troubles and sins.

Another common myth associated with the festival goes back to the legend of the great Samudra-Manthan episode. During the epic episode in Hindu Mythology, the milk-ocean was churned where all kinds of herbs and potions produced were to be divided between Devas and Asuras. But the churning also threw a pot of deadly poison Kalakatoom, which had the power to wipe out entire creation. Lord Shiva drank all the poison that came out from the churning, giving him the name Neelkantha (the one with blue throat). In the whole process, a few drops fell on the ground as well, which were drunk by Shiva's closest aides - snakes. The toxic level of the poison was enormous, hence to calm down its impact, the Devtas performed Ganga Abhishek on Lord Shiva and the snakes. The act of offering milk is a symbolic representation of the episode.
 

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Hindus also offer milk to snakes on the auspicious day to negate their Kal Sarpa dosh- an astrological imbalance in the position of their planets caused by Rahu and Ketu. Offering milk and rice to snakes and the Shivalingam are said to relieve one from all the calamity that lies ahead.

One can also find Lord Shiva adorning a snake on his neck in scriptures. The three coils around Shiva is the indication of the past, present and the future. Lord Vishnu is also represented as reclining on the bed of SheshNag, a five hooded snake in his characteristic calm and meditative stance.

Here's wishing you all a Happy Nag Panchami 2017!

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