Experts Develop a Device That Can Choose Recipes After Looking At Food Images

Experts suggest that analyzing food pictures can help understand people's eating habits and dietary preferences.

3 Shares
EMAIL
PRINT
COMMENTS
Experts Develop a Device That Can Choose Recipes After Looking At Food Images

Highlights

  1. Experts suggest analyzing food pictures can help understand eating habits
  2. A new device can analyse food images and suggest recipes for the same
  3. Experts faced difficulty in determining ingredients for more complex food
Ever imagined how will it be if you could derive recipes and ingredients just by looking at a yummy food picture online? The world of science suggests that it might not be a thing of far-fetched future. Experts from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed an artificial intelligence-based system that is capable of suggesting suitable ingredients and recipes of the food item shown in a picture.

Experts suggest that analyzing food pictures, that are widely and easily available on social media, can help understand people's eating habits and dietary preferences. Given a photo of a food item, 'Pic2Recipe' could identify ingredients like flour, eggs and butter, and then suggest several recipes that it determined to be similar to images from the database.

"You can imagine people using this to track their daily nutrition, or to photograph their meal at a restaurant and know what's needed to cook it at home later," said Christoph Trattner, assistant professor at MODUL University Vienna who was not involved in the study.

While experts faced difficulty in determining ingredients for more complex food items like sushi rolls, doing the same for foods like cookies and other desserts was comparatively easier. The team suggested working more on the system to be able to derive more elaborate and in-depth information about various eatables. The system can be seen as a vital tool in collecting a pool of food images from social media and arriving at the broader picture of what people eat on a day-to-day basis and how healthy their dietary choices actually are. If possible, the system could also suggest healthier substitutes for creating the same recipe.

Inputs from IANS

Comments

NDTV Beeps - your daily newsletter

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................