Japanese Climber Donates USD 100,000 to Everest Disaster's Kin

Japanese Climber Donates USD 100,000 to Everest Disaster's Kin
Kathmandu: A Japanese mountaineer today donated USD 100,000 to the families of victims of the deadliest mountaineering accident on Mount Everest that claimed 16 lives last month.

The Japanese climber Ken Noguchi, chairman of Seven Summits Actions for Sustainable Society, has summited the Everest twice.

"I would like to announce support of USD 100,000 to be used for the families of the deceased and missing climbers of the avalanche in the Everest on April 18," said Noguchi.

"The money will be used as compensation for the families of the deceased climbers and also intended for the support of such type of accident that may happen in future," he said.

The money will be handed over to the Nepal Mountaineering Association (NMA) that manages mountain climbing and looks after the welfare of the climbers.

Noguchi is the youngest among the seven summiteers, who have scaled the highest peaks in all seven continents including the world's highest peak Mt. Everest in 1999.

"The money will be used to establish a fund meant for the welfare of the climbing guides of Nepal," said Ang Tshering Sherpa, president of NMA.

The donation will be kept as seed money to establish a fund that would be used for providing education of the children of the deceased Sherpa guides, to carry out relief and rescue works and to provide income generating training programmes aimed at empowering mountain guides of Nepal.

Earlier, the NMA had donated Rs 50,000 as immediate relief to the kin of the deceased Sherpas. The NMA also provided Rs 35,000 to those who sustained injuries in the avalanche.

Trekking Agents Association of Nepal has also provided equal amount of relief to the deceased mountain guides.

The Nepal government gave Rs 40,000 to the family of the deceased mountaineering guides.

Altogether the kin of those killed in the avalanche received Rs 1,65,000 each from different organisations.

All the expedition activities on the Everest this spring were brought to a standstill following the accident.

However, the government has increased the validity of the permit provided to the expedition teams attempting to scale the Everest  this summer from two years to five years as a special gesture.

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