Chinese State Media Video Mocks India In Bizarre Propaganda On Doklam

An actor with a stick-on beard and heavily-accented English parodies Indians to canned laughter.

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Chinese State Media Video Mocks India In Bizarre Propaganda On Doklam

The Xinhua video features an anchor that calls India a "bad neighbor".

New Delhi: 

Highlights

  1. Xinhua video accuses India of committing "seven sins" in Doklam standoff
  2. Actor with stick-on beard, heavily-accented English parodies Indians
  3. Video posted through Xinhua's English-language account on Twitter
In an agitprop video that has amused more than angered Indians, China's official news agency Xinhua has accused India of committing "seven sins" in the two-month-long Doklam standoff near Sikkim and embellished its comments with poorly spelt subtitles and racial stereotypes.

The video, an edition of Xinhua's new "Spark" show, features anchor Dier Wang accusing India of "sins" that include "trespassing, confusing right and wrong, putting the blame on the victim, hijacking a small neighbour and sticking to a mistake knowingly."

The three-minute video has been posted through Xinhua's English-language account on Twitter; the micro-blogging site is blocked in China.
An actor with a stick-on beard and heavily-accented English parodies Indians to canned laughter.

"Do you negotiate with a robber who had just broken into your house... You just call 911 or just fight him back, right?" says Ms Wang. 911 is an emergency hotline only in the US.

The actor apparently representing a Sikh answers: "Why call 911 - don't you wanna play house, bro?"
 
xinhua video indias seven sins

Indians are parodied in the video by a man in a faux beard.

Ms Dier retorts: "If you wanna play, get out of my house first."

To explain the "hijacking" of a small neighbor, the video introduces a "Bhutanese man" who appears wary of the "Indian" inexplicably wagging a pair of scissors.

The video has spurred mostly jokes.
Xinhua is the biggest and most influential media organization in China.

The standoff at Doklam near Sikkim began in June when Indian soldiers entered the Doklam plateau - which is remote, uninhabited territory claimed by both China and India's ally Bhutan - to stop the Chinese army from constructing a road that Delhi says is a serious security concern because it changes the status quo at the tri-junction of the borders of India, China and Bhutan.

India has offered that both sides withdraw troops to engage in dialogue, but China has refused that option. China has repeatedly asked India to unilaterally withdraw troops or face the prospect of an escalation.

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