A Healthy Diet May Help Manage Multiple Sclerosis Better

A nutritionally balanced diet plan is important to help the body work to its full potential.

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A Healthy Diet May Help Manage Multiple Sclerosis Better

Highlights

  1. Sedentary lifestyle is one of the biggest perpetrators of obesity
  2. Multiple Sclerosis patients may benefit from a healthy lifestyle
  3. Multiple sclerosis is a condition typical to the immune system
Smoking, excessive alcohol and junk food consumption have long been associated with the risk of lifestyle diseases. Sedentary lifestyle is one of the biggest perpetrators of obesity which in turn leads to a host of ailments, A recent study published in an online journal Frontiers in Neurology reports that people suffering from Multiple Sclerosis may benefit from maintaining a healthy lifestyle which would involve maintaining a balanced diet, regular exercising, proper sleep and stress management and of course a check on smoking and alcohol consumption.

Multiple sclerosis is a condition typical to the immune system wherein the protective layer of nerves is damaged by the immune system. The condition affects the brain as well as the spinal cord. Some of the key symptoms include blurred vision, numbness weakness and muscle stiffness among others.

Diet and multiple sclerosis

A nutritionally balanced diet plan is important to help the body work to its full potential. It strengthens the immune system and may also help the body withstand the damage done due the condition. It is important to maintain your weight ad avoid weight gain to manage the condition better. Proteins, carbohydrates, essential fats, fibre, vitamins and minerals should all be a part of the diet of a person suffering from multiple sclerosis.

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, US, "although there's no special MS diet, what and how you eat can make a difference in your energy level, bladder and bowel function, and overall health. MS specialists recommend that people with MS adhere to the same low-fat, high-fiber diet recommendations of the American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society for the general population," as mentioned on the official website.

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