Eid ul Fitr 2017: Celebrating 'Meethi Eid' With Desserts From Across The World

With Eid Ul Fitr just round the corner, we had our curiosity raked and set out to unearth delicacies - unknown to us. Eid Mubarak!

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Eid ul Fitr 2017: Celebrating 'Meethi Eid' With Desserts From Across The World

Highlights

  1. Eid 2017 calls for a sumptuous spread of delicacies
  2. Traditional desserts hold utmost importance in celebrating meethi eid
  3. We bring to you, traditional Eid desserts from across the world
Malaysian bite-sized desserts

Eid 2017 calls for a sumptuous spread of delicacies to be adorned on your dinner table. If paya curry, a range of sumptuous kebabs, biryanis and delectable desserts are all that you can think of this Ramzan then you need to brace up for the yummy delights that Muslims across the world traditionally prepare to celebrate the holy month. With Eid Ul Fitr - Meethi Eid - just round the corner, we had our curiosity raked and set out to unearth delicacies - unknown to us - that people customary prepare and relish in different parts of the world to mark Ramzan and Eid festivities. Ready for the ride? Here we go!

Ka'ak

This sweet treat is usually prepared in the form of a cake and may differ in shape and form across Middle Eastern countries. The preparation has many variations and is also available in the form of bread in countries like Lebanon and Tunisia. Semolina based cookies are stuffed with ingredients like dates and walnuts to be finished as delectable desserts. Ka'ak bi ma'moul - semolina cookies - are greatly relished during Eid festivities in many Middle Eastern and Arab countries. Egyptian Muslims are believed to break their fast on the morning of the Eid Ul Fitr with Ka'ak and a glass of milk.


(Also Read: Why is Eid Ul Fitr is Also Called 'Meethi Eid'?)

 

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Mamonia

One can liken this to the desi sooji kheer cum halwa, while it remains the tradition semolina pudding of Syria. Semolina is roasted and then cooked with syrup and a host of nuts and dry fruits with a dash of cinnamon and star anise to seal the deal. It is traditionally sold on the morning of the Eid Ul Fitr by local vendors in Syria.

 

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Bint Alsahan

Another sweet delight, this one hails from Yemen. This looks like a pizza or a crepe. The recipe is fairly simple which involves baking dough in layers, often with a mixture of butter in between, and topping it with honey and nigella seeds.

 

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Kuih

Malaysian Muslims celebrate Eid, locally called Hari Raya, by preparing small, bite-sized desserts called Kuih. These are generally steamed and include wheat, eggs, butter and sugar as primary ingredients. These treats are not usually confined just as desserts but are also eaten throughout the day owing to their small portion size. Apart from Malaysian Eid festivities, these are also included in Chinese New Year celebrations.

 

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Eid Mubarak!

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