Amid Strain, India Does Not Rule Out Cutting Off Indus Water To Pakistan

2.3K Shares
EMAIL
PRINT
COMMENTS
Amid Strain, India Does Not Rule Out Cutting Off Indus Water To Pakistan

If India were to cut off Indus water supply, it could cause major crisis in Pakistan.

New Delhi: 

Highlights

  1. India and Pakistan signed the Indus Waters Treaty in 1960
  2. Under the treaty, India can use only 20% of the water of the Indus
  3. If India were to cut off water supply, it could trigger a crisis in Pak
Amid plummeting ties over the Kashmir unrest and Uri terror attack, India today did not rule out scrapping the Indus water treaty with Pakistan if it doesn't act against terror from its soil.  

At a press briefing, Foreign Ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup, when asked whether cancelling the Indus pact was an option, said: "Eventually any cooperative arrangement requires goodwill and cooperation on both sides."

When pressed for a more specific response, Mr Swarup said: "For any such treaty to work, it is important for mutual trust and cooperation. It cannot be a one-sided affair."

India and Pakistan signed the Indus Waters Treaty, brokered by the World Bank, in 1960.

According to this agreement, control over the three eastern rivers - the Beas, Ravi and Sutlej - was given to India and the three western rivers - the Indus, Chenab and Jhelum - went to Pakistan.

Under the treaty, India can use only 20 per cent of the water of the Indus, which flows through it first, for irrigation, transport and power generation.

If India were to cut off supply to Pakistan, it could cause major crisis in that country as a majority of its areas are dependent on Indus water.

The tenuous ties between India and Pakistan have been stretched thin over Pakistan's attacks on India at the UN with references to the Kashmir protests and Sunday's attack at an army base in Uri in the Valley, in which 18 soldiers were killed by terrorists of the Jaish-e-Mohammed, whose chief Masood Azhar is based in Pakistan.

New Delhi summoned Pakistan's High Commissioner Abdul Basit yesterday and presented to him, evidence of Pakistan's role in a series of attacks including in Pathankot in January and Uri.

The government also responded to Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's UN speech, in which he raised the Kashmir protests and glorified terrorist Burhan Wani, with a sharply worded statement.

"The land of Taxila, one of the greatest learning centres of ancient times, is now host to the Ivy League of terrorism," India said, calling Pakistan a terrorist state.

The Foreign Ministry spokesperson said: "We do not need to produce a dossier. The whole world knows what Pakistan's role is in sponsoring terror."

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................