Playboy Model Aims To Be First With Elon Musk's Neuralink Chip: "I Could Climb Everest At 90"

Kayla Kayden, the 35-year-old adult film star, said she expects the chip to improve her brain power.

Playboy Model Aims To Be First With Elon Musk's Neuralink Chip: 'I Could Climb Everest At 90'

Kayla Kayden said she wants to be a hybrid human.

A Playboy model has said that she wants to be the first person to be implanted with the brain chip being developed by Elon Musk's company Neuralink. Speaking to The Sun, Kayla Kayden wants to become the world's first "hybrid human". Mr Musk's brain-chip startup received approval from an independent review board in September last year for the first human trial of its brain implant for paralysis patients. Neuralink promises to be a link between man and machine, facilitating humans to interact with the machines using their brain power.

Mr Musk has grand ambitions to Neuralink, saying it would facilitate speedy surgical insertions of its chip devices to treat conditions like obesity, autism, depression and schizophrenia.

The adult film star, 35, said she expects the chip to improve her brain power.

"People use botox for their face, this would be the same but for the brain. I won't have to worry about the effects of ageing on my brain. As a hybrid human, the possibilities are endless," Ms Kayden told The Sun.

She claimed she has saved money for the procedure and signed up for the research too.

"I could climb Everest at 90 years old, I could always be working when I don't have a computer in front of my face. And for safety, I would be less scared going places alone and I would never have to worry about directions or holding my phone," the Playboy model said.

"I would never question anything because I could always get the answer fast. I think if it will make me smarter, I want to do it. I want to be part machine," Ms Kayden added.

Mr Musk's critics have warned against going forward with the project, saying it will lead to a dystopian future. Neuralink has denied all these allegations, saying their intent is to help people with disabilities. At the moment, Neuralink's initial trial applications are restricted to paralysis patients.

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