Ben Guarino The Washington Post


'Ben Guarino The Washington Post' - 110 News Result(s)

  • Spiders Can Float In The Air. Scientists Just Found Out How They Lift Off

    Spiders Can Float In The Air. Scientists Just Found Out How They Lift Off

    A rain of spiders drowned the Australian town of Goulburn in silk in 2015. A Goulburn resident who bravely looked up saw a several-hundred-yard tunnel of spiderlings in the air, he said. The spiders parachuted in on long strands of webbing, a behavior that biologists call "ballooning."

  • No Evidence That Having Sex With Robots Is Healthy: Report

    No Evidence That Having Sex With Robots Is Healthy: Report

    Sex sells, and robots are no exception. One of the most expensive consumer robots under development, a machine named Harmony, is a $15,000 union of silicone curves and silicon chips. Sex doll maker Realbotix bills Harmony as "the perfect companion." But healthy companionship is too bold a claim to make about sex robots, warn a pair of doctors in a ...

  • Pluto Has Windswept Dunes Even Though It Shouldn't Have Enough Wind To Sweep

    Pluto Has Windswept Dunes Even Though It Shouldn't Have Enough Wind To Sweep

    By Earth's standards, you could hardly imagine a stranger world than frigid, tiny Pluto. It resides in the far corner of the solar system at an average of about 4 billion miles from the sun. NASA's New Horizons probe, which flew within 7,800 miles of the dwarf planet in July 2015, gave us the best look at Pluto yet. There, temperatures plunge to mi...

  • People Who Sleep In On Weekends Avoid Dying Young, Study Suggests

    People Who Sleep In On Weekends Avoid Dying Young, Study Suggests

    Sleeping in on a day off feels marvelous, especially for those of us who don't get nearly enough rest during the workweek. But are the extra weekend winks worth it? It's a question that psychologist Torbjorn Akerstedt, director of the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University, and his colleagues tried to answer in a study published Wednesda...

  • Giant Predatory Worms Invaded France Long Ago, But Scientists Just Noticed Them

    Giant Predatory Worms Invaded France Long Ago, But Scientists Just Noticed Them

    When Jean-Lou Justine received the first photograph of a giant worm with a head like a shovel, the biologist was astounded.

  • 'Unique In The World' Fossil Footprints Show A Human Chasing An Extinct Giant Sloth

    'Unique In The World' Fossil Footprints Show A Human Chasing An Extinct Giant Sloth

    A human followed quite literally in the sloth's footsteps. "Given the arid environment, there is quite a narrow amount of time you can walk on that surface to record your footprint," said Matteo Belvedere, a scientist with Switzerland's Paleontology A16 project who specializes in trackways and was not involved with this research.

  • A Tiny Skeleton Found In Chile Might Look Like An Alien, But Her Genes Tell A Different Story

    A Tiny Skeleton Found In Chile Might Look Like An Alien, But Her Genes Tell A Different Story

    The Atacama skeleton, or Ata, named after the Chilean desert where the remains were found, has 10 pairs of ribs. The average person has 12. Ata's skull narrows to a ridged peak. Her bones are as calcified as those of a child between the ages of 6 and 8. Yet her skeleton's apparent age is at odds with her size. If Ata ever stood, she stood 6 inches ...

  • Humans Bred With This Mysterious Species More Than Once, New Study Shows

    Humans Bred With This Mysterious Species More Than Once, New Study Shows

    We rarely portray Neanderthals, our close relatives, as telegenic. Museum exhibits give them wild tangles of hair, and Hollywood reduces them to grunting unsophisticates.

  • This Feathery Dinosaur Probably Flew, But Not Like Any Bird You Know

    This Feathery Dinosaur Probably Flew, But Not Like Any Bird You Know

    In 1861, German paleontologist Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer wrote a short paper about a fossil so unusual he first thought it was a fake. What appeared to be a bird feather was pressed into 150-million-year-old limestone. Von Meyer labeled it Archaeopteryx, meaning old wing, and a full skeleton was found shortly thereafter.

  • Fake News Spreads 'Farther, Faster, Deeper' Than Truth, Study Finds

    Fake News Spreads 'Farther, Faster, Deeper' Than Truth, Study Finds

    A tweet can wreak havoc in a few hundred characters, as demonstrated in April 2013 when someone hacked the Associated Press Twitter account and claimed that explosions at the White House had injured President Barack Obama. There were no explosions - and Obama was fine - but the Dow Jones average sank by 100 points in two minutes. Stock markets swif...

  • These Record-Breaking Pictures Were Taken By The Farthest Camera From Earth

    These Record-Breaking Pictures Were Taken By The Farthest Camera From Earth

    They may not look like much more than blue-green smudges, but the images are record-breakers. The machine that took these photos was farther from Earth than any other functioning camera in existence.

  • Centipedes Eat Animals 15 Times Their Size Thanks To This Powerful Toxin, Study Finds

    Centipedes Eat Animals 15 Times Their Size Thanks To This Powerful Toxin, Study Finds

    A bite from a venomous centipede can cause swelling and excruciating pain. And for a mouse - even one 15 times larger than a centipede - the bite can be deadly.

  • 4,000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummies Were Thought To Be Brothers. Genetics Tells A Different Story.

    4,000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummies Were Thought To Be Brothers. Genetics Tells A Different Story.

    Long ago, Egyptians carved a cemetery into a rock wall along the Nile River 250 miles south of Cairo. The cemetery outlasted its 12th Dynasty creators. It survived intermittent pillaging by tomb raiders. And then in 1907, an excavator named Erfai discovered an untouched tomb. This was an unusual burial site. Within the tomb lay two high-society men...

  • Mars Hides 'A Fantastic Find' Of Thick Sheets Of Ice Just Below The Surface

    Mars Hides 'A Fantastic Find' Of Thick Sheets Of Ice Just Below The Surface

    The slope rises as high as London's Big Ben tower. Beneath its ruddy layer of dirt is a sheet of ice 300 feet thick that gives the landscape a blue-black hue. If such a scene sounds otherworldly, it is. To visit it, you'll have to travel to Mars.

  • Climate Change Is Turning 99% Of These Baby Sea Turtles Female

    Climate Change Is Turning 99% Of These Baby Sea Turtles Female

    Green sea turtles do not develop into males or females due to sex chromosomes, like humans and most other mammals do. Instead, the temperature outside a turtle egg influences the sex of the growing embryo. And this unusual biological quirk, scientists say, endangers their future in a warmer world.

'Ben Guarino The Washington Post' - 110 News Result(s)

  • Spiders Can Float In The Air. Scientists Just Found Out How They Lift Off

    Spiders Can Float In The Air. Scientists Just Found Out How They Lift Off

    A rain of spiders drowned the Australian town of Goulburn in silk in 2015. A Goulburn resident who bravely looked up saw a several-hundred-yard tunnel of spiderlings in the air, he said. The spiders parachuted in on long strands of webbing, a behavior that biologists call "ballooning."

  • No Evidence That Having Sex With Robots Is Healthy: Report

    No Evidence That Having Sex With Robots Is Healthy: Report

    Sex sells, and robots are no exception. One of the most expensive consumer robots under development, a machine named Harmony, is a $15,000 union of silicone curves and silicon chips. Sex doll maker Realbotix bills Harmony as "the perfect companion." But healthy companionship is too bold a claim to make about sex robots, warn a pair of doctors in a ...

  • Pluto Has Windswept Dunes Even Though It Shouldn't Have Enough Wind To Sweep

    Pluto Has Windswept Dunes Even Though It Shouldn't Have Enough Wind To Sweep

    By Earth's standards, you could hardly imagine a stranger world than frigid, tiny Pluto. It resides in the far corner of the solar system at an average of about 4 billion miles from the sun. NASA's New Horizons probe, which flew within 7,800 miles of the dwarf planet in July 2015, gave us the best look at Pluto yet. There, temperatures plunge to mi...

  • People Who Sleep In On Weekends Avoid Dying Young, Study Suggests

    People Who Sleep In On Weekends Avoid Dying Young, Study Suggests

    Sleeping in on a day off feels marvelous, especially for those of us who don't get nearly enough rest during the workweek. But are the extra weekend winks worth it? It's a question that psychologist Torbjorn Akerstedt, director of the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University, and his colleagues tried to answer in a study published Wednesda...

  • Giant Predatory Worms Invaded France Long Ago, But Scientists Just Noticed Them

    Giant Predatory Worms Invaded France Long Ago, But Scientists Just Noticed Them

    When Jean-Lou Justine received the first photograph of a giant worm with a head like a shovel, the biologist was astounded.

  • 'Unique In The World' Fossil Footprints Show A Human Chasing An Extinct Giant Sloth

    'Unique In The World' Fossil Footprints Show A Human Chasing An Extinct Giant Sloth

    A human followed quite literally in the sloth's footsteps. "Given the arid environment, there is quite a narrow amount of time you can walk on that surface to record your footprint," said Matteo Belvedere, a scientist with Switzerland's Paleontology A16 project who specializes in trackways and was not involved with this research.

  • A Tiny Skeleton Found In Chile Might Look Like An Alien, But Her Genes Tell A Different Story

    A Tiny Skeleton Found In Chile Might Look Like An Alien, But Her Genes Tell A Different Story

    The Atacama skeleton, or Ata, named after the Chilean desert where the remains were found, has 10 pairs of ribs. The average person has 12. Ata's skull narrows to a ridged peak. Her bones are as calcified as those of a child between the ages of 6 and 8. Yet her skeleton's apparent age is at odds with her size. If Ata ever stood, she stood 6 inches ...

  • Humans Bred With This Mysterious Species More Than Once, New Study Shows

    Humans Bred With This Mysterious Species More Than Once, New Study Shows

    We rarely portray Neanderthals, our close relatives, as telegenic. Museum exhibits give them wild tangles of hair, and Hollywood reduces them to grunting unsophisticates.

  • This Feathery Dinosaur Probably Flew, But Not Like Any Bird You Know

    This Feathery Dinosaur Probably Flew, But Not Like Any Bird You Know

    In 1861, German paleontologist Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer wrote a short paper about a fossil so unusual he first thought it was a fake. What appeared to be a bird feather was pressed into 150-million-year-old limestone. Von Meyer labeled it Archaeopteryx, meaning old wing, and a full skeleton was found shortly thereafter.

  • Fake News Spreads 'Farther, Faster, Deeper' Than Truth, Study Finds

    Fake News Spreads 'Farther, Faster, Deeper' Than Truth, Study Finds

    A tweet can wreak havoc in a few hundred characters, as demonstrated in April 2013 when someone hacked the Associated Press Twitter account and claimed that explosions at the White House had injured President Barack Obama. There were no explosions - and Obama was fine - but the Dow Jones average sank by 100 points in two minutes. Stock markets swif...

  • These Record-Breaking Pictures Were Taken By The Farthest Camera From Earth

    These Record-Breaking Pictures Were Taken By The Farthest Camera From Earth

    They may not look like much more than blue-green smudges, but the images are record-breakers. The machine that took these photos was farther from Earth than any other functioning camera in existence.

  • Centipedes Eat Animals 15 Times Their Size Thanks To This Powerful Toxin, Study Finds

    Centipedes Eat Animals 15 Times Their Size Thanks To This Powerful Toxin, Study Finds

    A bite from a venomous centipede can cause swelling and excruciating pain. And for a mouse - even one 15 times larger than a centipede - the bite can be deadly.

  • 4,000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummies Were Thought To Be Brothers. Genetics Tells A Different Story.

    4,000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummies Were Thought To Be Brothers. Genetics Tells A Different Story.

    Long ago, Egyptians carved a cemetery into a rock wall along the Nile River 250 miles south of Cairo. The cemetery outlasted its 12th Dynasty creators. It survived intermittent pillaging by tomb raiders. And then in 1907, an excavator named Erfai discovered an untouched tomb. This was an unusual burial site. Within the tomb lay two high-society men...

  • Mars Hides 'A Fantastic Find' Of Thick Sheets Of Ice Just Below The Surface

    Mars Hides 'A Fantastic Find' Of Thick Sheets Of Ice Just Below The Surface

    The slope rises as high as London's Big Ben tower. Beneath its ruddy layer of dirt is a sheet of ice 300 feet thick that gives the landscape a blue-black hue. If such a scene sounds otherworldly, it is. To visit it, you'll have to travel to Mars.

  • Climate Change Is Turning 99% Of These Baby Sea Turtles Female

    Climate Change Is Turning 99% Of These Baby Sea Turtles Female

    Green sea turtles do not develop into males or females due to sex chromosomes, like humans and most other mammals do. Instead, the temperature outside a turtle egg influences the sex of the growing embryo. And this unusual biological quirk, scientists say, endangers their future in a warmer world.

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