This Article is From Sep 12, 2013

When Mumbai children played for Maestro Zubin Mehta

The children, aged between 8-16 years, showcased their talents in choir singing and western classical music.

Mumbai: It was a fitting finale to Composer Zubin Mehta's India visit.

The renowned composer who gave us the scintillating Ehssas-E-Kashmir was treated at an Ehsaas-E-Mumbai on Wednesday afternoon courtesy around 80 children of the Mehli Mehta Music Foundation. The aim of the two decade old centre is to develop and nurture young talent in Western Classical Music. Zubin Mehta is the inspiration behind the Foundation which is named after his father Mehli Mehta who was a Violinist and Conductor in his own right.  

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The children, aged between 8-16 years, showcased their talents in choir singing and western classical music. Armed with their Violins, Viola, Trumpets and Triangles, they performed pieces ranging from Bach and Tchaikovsky for the Maestro filling the Gateway Room of the iconic Taj Mahal Hotel with their renditions of the Kinder Symphony and Nutcracker March among others. Mr Mehta seemed to enjoy the performance just as much.

The highlight of the evening was also a small interaction between the Maestro and the children. A young boy asked Mr Mehta about his confusion in choosing between music and another career in his future.

Mr Mehta responded by saying, "At some point you know. You have to listen to your heart. I knew at University that medicine was just not for me. I saved many lives by not being a doctor!"

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For the children in the room, Mr Mehta was no less than a rock star. They flocked to him for his autographs and to take pictures with him. One of them later said, "When I told my friends at school I would perform for Zubin Mehta, they wondered who he was, then I told them, then they saw him on TV and figured he was really famous!"

Speaking of his experience of the day to NDTV, the only media channel there, Mr Mehta said he hoped the children exposed to some if the best talent in western Classical music in the country benefited from it.

Pointing to the children he said, "See these children, they are the future. It depends on every parent and child on how these children are brought up, how they are nurtured and developed. And then who knows! They may blossom, that single rose in a garden of thorns, who knows!"