Sachin: A Billion Dreams Box Office Collection Day 2: Sachin Tendulkar's Film Makes Rs 9.20 Crores

Sachin: A Billion Dreams received a good response from the audience on the opening day. The film, which is a delight to all cricket fans, showed an upward trend on day two

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Sachin: A Billion Dreams Box Office Collection Day 2: Sachin Tendulkar's Film Makes Rs 9.20 Crores

Sachin: A Billion Dreams Box Office: A still from the movie

New Delhi: 

Highlights

  1. The film has earned a total of Rs 17.60 crores in all languages
  2. On day one, the film managed to collect Rs 8.40 crores at the box-office
  3. Film released across theatres in Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, English
Sachin: A Billion Dreams received a good response from the audience on the opening day. The film, which is a delight to all cricket fans, showed an upward trend on day two. The film recorded a box office collection of Rs 9.20 crores on Saturday, reported trade analyst Taran Adarsh. Sachin: A Billion Dreams released across theatres in Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu and English. The film has earned a total of Rs 17.60 crores in all languages, reported Mr Adarsh. "FANTASTIC for a docu-drama," he tweeted. On day one, the film managed to collect Rs 8.40 crores at the box-office.
 

Sachin: A Billion Dreams is a biopic on legendary cricketer Sachin Tendulkar, directed by James Erskine. The film tracks Sachin's journey from an aspiring cricketer to one of the best batsman. The movie features real footage, including clips from Sachin Tendulkar's matches, interviews with colleagues and family and cricketers Virat Kohli and M S Dhoni.

Ahead of the film's release, Sachin Tendulkar hosted a special screening of the film in Mumbai, which was attended by Bollywood celebrities and the Indian cricket team.

In his review for NDTV, Raja Sen said that the film will bring back all our Sachin Tendulkar memories. "Sachin: A Billion Dreams is thankfully not a biopic. This is a documentary not merely about the man with that name, but one narrated by him, one where he tells his own story in his own words. It is not journalistic or incisive or probing. It feels, instead, intimate - as intimate as it can feel, anyway, for a film where an audience claps and cheers alongside those who clapped and cheered live, years ago. Which is to say: it is us today applauding in time with us yesterday," he writes.
 

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