Imran Khan Warns Of "Biggest Protest In Pakistan's History"

During a recent rally, Imran Khan even said Pakistan could "break up into three parts" if the establishment did not take the right decisions.

Imran Khan Warns Of 'Biggest Protest In Pakistan's History'

Following his ouster from power, Imran Khan has been holding several rallies.

Islamabad:

Former Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has said that he would within the next few days finalise the date for the "biggest protest in Pakistan's history".

"We have to go all-in for our campaign for true freedom in the next phase. I will give a date within the next few days," Dawn newspaper quoted Khan as saying.

Addressing the PTI's National Council meeting in Islamabad, Imran Khan said his party is consulting with its lawyers but called on party workers to be prepared. "It will be the biggest protest in the country's history. This is our right."

"I have told all party organisations to be prepared. We are waiting to get the all-clear from the Supreme Court. As soon as that is done, I will give the date," Khan said.

Following his ouster from power, Khan has been holding several rallies, reiterating the foreign conspiracy allegations and his rebuke of the "selected government" against the Shehbaz Sharif government.

During a recent rally, the beleaguered PTI chief even said Pakistan could "break up into three parts" if the establishment did not take the right decisions.

In an opinion piece for Dawn, Pakistan analyst Zahid Hussain said such reckless statements by a former prime minister raise serious concerns about his motives.

"He would prefer military intervention to the political process taking its own course. His destructive populist politics is extremely dangerous not only for democracy but also for national security," said Hussain.

On Wednesday, Pakistan Defense Minister Khwaja Asif said Wednesday that Imran Khan was attempting to reach out to the establishment to escape a difficult situation.

"Imran Khan is confused and bereft of senses as a result of frustration and failure. His rhetoric against the Pakistani army is still resonating in the air, but he is now seeking assistance from the establishment," Asif said during a programme on Geo News.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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