Haunting "Knocking" Sounds From Titan Submersible Heard In New Audio

The Titan submersible went missing during a deep sea underwater excursion near the wreckage of the Titanic in the Atlantic Ocean in June 2023. Its debris were discovered four days later by a remotely operated underwater vehicle.

Haunting 'Knocking' Sounds From Titan Submersible Heard In New Audio

All five members of the submersible's crew in the accident.

News about haunting new audio clip from the doomed Titan submersible is making the rounds on the internet. The clip contains mysterious knocking sounds that gave false hope that the Titan submersible and its occupants could be rescued. According to a New York Post report, the clips are part of a new documentary from Channel 5 titled 'The Titan Sub Disaster: Minute by Minute'. This is the first time that the audio from the submersible has been played on television, the outlet further said.

When the submersible lost contact with its mothership on the surface, reports said that banging noises were reverberating in the depths at 30-minute intervals.

These sounds had raised hopes that someone was alive and trying to send a message.

But experts later said that the noise couldn't have been the passengers or the crew as they died instantly when the submersible imploded due to too much pressure.

It's not clear, however, what the knocking actually was.

"It could be somebody knocking. The symmetry between those knockings is very unusual," former Navy submarine Captain Ryan Ramsey said in the documentary. 

"It's rhythmic, it's like somebody is making that sound, and the fact that it is repeated is really unusual," he added.

The Titan submersible went missing during a deep sea underwater excursion near the wreckage of the Titanic in the Atlantic Ocean in June 2023. Its debris were discovered four days later by a remotely operated underwater vehicle.

All five members of the submersible's crew in the accident. They were: British businessman Hamish Harding, British-Pakistani businessman Shahzada Dawood and his 19-year-old son Suleman, former French Navy diver Paul-Henry Nargeolet and OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush.

In October last year, the US Coast Guard announced that it has recovered last pieces of the submersible.

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