At UN, Bangladesh PM Talks Of 1971 'Genocide', Reminds Pak Of 'Defeat'

The war in 1971 broke after a sudden crackdown at midnight on March 25, 1971 in the erstwhile East Pakistan by the Pakistani troops and ended on December 16. Pakistan had conceded defeat and unconditionally surrendered in Dhaka to the allied forces comprising the freedom fighters and the Indian soldiers.

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At UN, Bangladesh PM Talks Of 1971 'Genocide', Reminds Pak Of 'Defeat'

1971 Bangladesh War: Pakistan conceded defeat and unconditionally surrendered in Dhaka

United Nations:  Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has hit out at Pakistan, saying its army had launched a "heinous" military operation in 1971 which triggered a "genocide" during the liberation war, killing 3 million innocent people.

In her address to the UN General Assembly yesterday, Prime Minister Hasina said her country's parliament had recently declared 25th March as 'Genocide Day' to pay homage to the victims.

The war in 1971 broke after a sudden crackdown at midnight on March 25, 1971 in the erstwhile East Pakistan by the Pakistani troops and ended on December 16.

The same year Pakistan conceded defeat and unconditionally surrendered in Dhaka to the allied forces comprising the freedom fighters and the Indian soldiers.

Officially three million people were killed during the nine-month long war.

"In the 1971 war of liberation, we endured an extreme form of genocide. In the 9-month-long war of liberation against Pakistan 3 million innocent people were killed and more than 200,000 women were violated," Ms Hasina said.

"The Pakistan military launched the heinous 'operation searchlight' on 25th March which was the beginning of the 1971 genocide. The 1971 genocide included targeted elimination of individuals on the ground of religion, race and political belief. The intellectuals were killed brutally," Ms Hasina said.

Exercising its right to response, Pakistan rejected Prime Minister Hasina's statement, and claimed that there are "no takers" for what Bangladesh says.

"They have to come out of the narrative of hate and dispel the twisted notions of history. There are no takers for their contentions," Pakistan claimed late last night.

In her speech, Prime Minister Hasina also said that terrorism and violent extremism had become a major threat to peace, stability and development.

"Terrorists have no religion, belief or race. Having been a target of a number of terrorist attacks myself, I personally empathise with the victims of terrorism and appreciate their need for protection. We denounce the use of religion to justify violent extremism," she said.

Prime Minister Hasina reiterated her call to stop supplying arms to the terrorists and to stop terror financing, besides settling all international disputes peacefully.

"I also urge the UN to address the growing threats emanating from the cyber space to prevent money laundering, terrorist financing and other transnational organised crimes," she said.
 

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