Shashi Tharoor's Word Of The Day For "Those Who Make Snarky Remarks..."

In a tweet, Shashi Tharoor shared a cartoon, serving as a reminder why "enunciation" or pronouncing words clearly is important.

Shashi Tharoor's Word Of The Day For 'Those Who Make Snarky Remarks...'

Shashi Tharoor's latest tweet on "enunciation" amused his followers. (File photo)

New Delhi:

Congress leader Shashi Tharoor, known to amuse his Twitter followers with his fabulous vocabulary, this morning gave a cheeky response to those "who issue snarky remarks daily" about his diction.

In a tweet, the 65-year-old MP from Kerala's Thiruvananthapuram shared a cartoon, serving as a reminder why "enunciation" or pronouncing words clearly is important. 

Mr Tharoor, who is recuperating after testing positive for coronavirus in April, tweeted: "This is for all those who issue snarky remarks daily about my diction - a reminder of why enunciation *is* important! (sic)"

Titled "The Enunciation Apocalypse", the cartoon shows some military personnel inside a monitoring station with large television screens hanging from the wall. 

One of them gives a command to Alexa, the voice-controlled virtual assistant. Asked to order "lunch", the device misunderstands and takes it for missile "launch". 

The tweet has drawn a lot of attention from Mr Tharoor's followers; it got nearly 1,000 likes and a number of comments within an hour of being shared. 

A user said, "I love your enunciation. Let them say as then your tweet keeps reappearing which is so relaxing."

Another said, “No such problem in Hindi. Try it.”

Then there were a few who said “Enunciation” is the word of the day. 

Take a look at some of the other reactions:

Mr Tharoor has often been called a wordsmith. Last month, Mr Tharoor used a rarely used word- “floccinaucinihilipilification” - during banter with fellow politician and TRS chief KT Rama Rao.

The word made Twitter users run for their dictionaries. The noun means “the action or habit of estimating something as worthless”, according to the Oxford dictionary.

Before that, Mr Tharoor has stumped people with “farrago” and “troglodyte”. "Farrago" means a confused mixture and "troglodyte" means a person regarded as being deliberately ignorant or old-fashioned.