Top Medical Body Gives More Time To Respond On Broadcast Of Live Surgery

The NMC stated that the suggestions on live surgery broadcast by private hospitals should be sent to the Ethics and Medical Registration Board.

Top Medical Body Gives More Time To Respond On Broadcast Of Live Surgery
New Delhi:

The National Medical Commission (NMC) recently issued a notification seeking comments from stakeholders on whether surgery should be broadcast on live TV. In an official notification to the stakeholders, the NMC has yet again asked the concerned persons to submit their comments in order to help the medical commission in taking balanced and informed decision. 

The NMC stated that the suggestions and comments on live surgery broadcast by private hospitals should be sent to the Ethics and Medical Registration Board through an email within 10 days of the publication of the notice. The notice was issued on January 29, 2024.

The commission has constituted a committee of experts to provide recommendations on the issue of live broadcast.

The notice issued by the NMC noted that many private hospitals were commercially exploring the patients by using them as models. Giving an option of the pre-recorded surgical videos, the NMC added that the companies are promoting themselves and making a fortune out of the miseries of the exploited patients at the expense of patient safety.

The official notification from the NMC read, "In the Writ Petition (Civil) No. 1141/2023 before the Supreme Court of India in the matter of Rahil Chaudhary and others v/s Union of India and others, the petitioner has held that many private hospitals are commercially exploring the patients and using them as models to fulfill their ulterior motives through live surgery broadcasts in conferences."

"Various companies are promoting themselves and make a fortune out of the miseries of the exploited patients. Advertising sponsorship and professional showmanship overshadow the true purpose of these broadcasts. Healthcare facilities showcase their capabilities, surgeons flaunt their skills and companies promote their products at the expense of patient safety. Pre-recorded surgical videos, edited to meet educational needs can achieve the same objectives with far less risk."

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