Bengaluru Gears Up For Farmers' Protest On Republic Day

Police are however preparing for the arrival of protesters, and the commissioner said that 4,000 to 5,000 police personnel will be deployed on the ground to maintain law and order.

Bengaluru Gears Up For Farmers' Protest On Republic Day

Bengaluru has earlier seen protests by farmers and also by the Congress on the issue (File)

Bengaluru:

Farmers' organisations in Karnataka are hoping that thousands will gather in the state capital Bengaluru for a rally against the centre's agriculture laws. The farmers' groups are sharing messages asking protesters to gather with their "tractor, car, motorcycle" at four locations on the outskirts of the city on roads leading into Bengaluru - and also at the city's main railway station.

The city's police commissioner, Kamal Pant, told NDTV that he expects numbers to be much less than the 25,000-figure given by some of the organisers. He also said that holding a peaceful protest at the city's Freedom Park would not be an issue and that different groups had applied for permission.

But he said permission was unlikely to be granted for any tractor rally.

According to the police, the plans for the rally through the city were too last minute and would impact the city's traffic. They also said that Delhi's rally route was finalised after a week of negotiation.

Police are however preparing for the arrival of protesters, and the commissioner said that 4,000 to 5,000 police personnel will be deployed on the ground to maintain law and order.

C Patil, the honorary state president of the Karnataka Rajya Raitha Sangha, said around 5,000 tractors and 1,000 jeeps, cars and two-wheelers are expected.

"If the government stops the rally then the next day, we will organise a programme in each district and taluk. If there is a law-and-order problem, the state will have to take responsibility," he said.

Bengaluru has earlier seen protests by farmers and also by the Congress on the issue. Leaders in the government in the BJP-ruled state back the plans of the centre and say the new laws were framed with the welfare of farmers in mind.