Taliban Hunt For Woman Journalist Who Opposed The Terrorist Group: Report

Saira Saleem also informed that six Taliban members came to her home four nights ago, knocking gruffly on the door. As she hid beneath her bed, the fighters questioned her father on her whereabouts.

Taliban Hunt For Woman Journalist Who Opposed The Terrorist Group: Report

Saira Saleem has not left her house since Afghanistan's takeover by the terrorist group. (File)

Kabul:

Saira Saleem, a women's rights activist and journalist who earlier raised her voice against the oppression of the Taliban, informed that the terrorist group's members are searching for her.

Saleem also informed that six Taliban members came to her home four nights ago, knocking gruffly on the door. As she hid beneath her bed, the fighters questioned her father on her whereabouts. He told them his daughter was not home, New York Post reported.

"They stood in front of our house with the Taliban flag in the car and asked questions about whether I was in fear of losing my life," She said.

"The Taliban has said "we should see your daughter when she arrives ... I am scared, and even if I get out of the house, the Taliban will recognise me," Saleem added.

Saleem has not left her house since Afghanistan's hostile takeover by the terrorist group.

Not just Saleem but experts suggest that Afghan women are most likely to face an uncertain future under the terrorist group regime.

Earlier, Sajjan Gohel, a security and terrorism analyst said that women are scared out of their (Taliban) minds, according to Four Nine, a prominent women's magazine in the West.

"From the Afghan women I've spoken to, it's incredibly traumatic. You're looking at an entire generation who only read about the Taliban in books. Now, they're having to live side-by-side with what is effectively a misogynistic cult." Gohel added.

He also said that he believes we are going to see a return "to some degree of what we saw in the 1990s".

According to the international security director at the Asia-Pacific Foundation: "Women's lives [from 1996 to 2001] were very bleak and severely repressed by the Taliban. You're looking at an era where every aspect of a woman's life was controlled, contained, and confined." reported Four Nine.

The Taliban has proposed a ban on coeducation. Terrorist group's officials in Herat province had last week ordered that girls will no longer be allowed to sit in the same classes as boys in universities, Khaama Press report.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)