This Article is From Jan 20, 2024

Can Lunar Ice Quench Astronauts' Thirst? This Contest Seeks Solutions To Purify Moon Water

Scientists are investigating the composition and potential contaminants in lunar water to ensure it meets safety standards.

Can Lunar Ice Quench Astronauts' Thirst? This Contest Seeks Solutions To Purify Moon Water

A new contest asks public for ideas on how to purify drinking water available on moon.

Water, a crucial resource for life, plays a vital role in both Earth and space exploration. Recent findings suggest the presence of water on the Moon, raising the prospect of sustaining future human missions. However, the safety of moon water for consumption remains uncertain. While the moon's water could potentially be utilized for various purposes, including life support and fuel production, its suitability for drinking requires careful examination. 

Scientists are investigating the composition and potential contaminants in lunar water to ensure it meets safety standards. As we envision human expansion into space, understanding and responsibly utilizing lunar water will become essential priorities.

Water seems to be plentiful near the moon's south pole, but making it safe for astronauts to drink is a challenge. To address this, a new competition called Aqualunar is inviting the public to come up with ideas to purify water on the moon.

This could help cut down on the amount of water that needs to be sent from Earth for astronauts. The contest is open to people in Canada and the United Kingdom, and you can submit your ideas until April 8. It's an opportunity for everyone to contribute to making space exploration more sustainable.

"It is very likely that water exists on the moon, but it contains contaminants," the Canadian Space Agency wrote in its briefing for participants.

"Removing the current known contaminants from Moon water to grow food and provide propellant and drinking water would not only help support human space exploration; it could also help advance water purification technologies here on Earth."

This information comes from a planned crash of a NASA spacecraft called LCROSS, which happened on October 9, 2009. The crash targeted the icy south pole of the moon and provided data suggesting the presence of water, but it also hinted that the water might not be completely pure.

.