Watch: As India Gets Cheetahs Back, An Explainer On Why They Went Extinct

Indian Forest Service (IFS) officer Parveen Kaswan took to social media to explain what led to the extinction of cheetahs in India.

Watch: As India Gets Cheetahs Back, An Explainer On Why They Went Extinct

A total of eight cheetahs - five females and three males - were brought to Madhya Pradesh from Namibia.

New Delhi:

Prime Minister Narendra Modi released cheetahs flown in from Namibia into a special enclosure at Madhya Pradesh's Kuno National Park (KNP) on Saturday.

The cheetah transfer is part of a programme to reintroduce the animals into India's forests, nearly seven decades after they were declared extinct in the country.

The prime minister, who is celebrating his 72nd birthday on Saturday, clicked some photographs of the felines after they were released into the enclosure.

Meanwhile, Indian Forest Service (IFS) officer Parveen Kaswan took to social media to explain what led to the extinction of cheetahs in India.

In a series of tweets, Mr Kaswan shared video clips dating as far back as 1939 to explain how the last cheetahs in India were hunted or domesticated for hunting parties. 

"When #Cheetah are coming back to #India. A look at how the last of the lots were hunted, maimed and domesticated for hunting parties. Video made in 1939," wrote Mr Kaswan.

"Historical record suggests cheetah were in least conflict with humans. Rather they were domesticated and used by hunting parties widely. Even some used to call them 'hunting leopards'.

"Not only cheetah but most of the charismatic animals were hunted in those days by kings and britishers. Until the Wildlife Protection Act 1972 was passed it was very late. Cheetah were already extinct from India. Footage is archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd," Mr Kaswan tweeted.

The IFS officer also shared old photographs and paintings of cheetahs being domesticated to use them during hunts. 

A total of eight cheetahs - five females and three males - were brought to Madhya Pradesh from Namibia in a Boeing aircraft on Saturday morning as part of 'Project Cheetah', the world's first inter-continental large wild carnivore translocation project.

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