Nag Panchami 2020: Puja Muhurat, Significance And All You Need To Know

Nag Panchami 2020: Nag Panchami will be observed tomorrow, July 25. It is one of the oldest festivals celebrated across India,during the rainy season.

Nag Panchami 2020: Puja Muhurat, Significance And All You Need To Know

Nag Panchami 2020 date: The festival will be observed on July 25, Saturday

Nag Panchami 2020: Soon after Hariyali Teej is Nag Panchami, another significant day in the month of Sawan. Nag Panchami will be observed tomorrow, July 25. As the name suggests, the day is dedicated to the Naga Devta or the snake god. Nag Panchami is also one of the oldest festivals celebrated across India, during the rainy season. Sawan or Shravan, a most auspicious month in the Hindu calendar, that corresponds to July-August.

Nag Panchami is also known as Nag Chaturthi or Nagul Chavithi. In Gujarat, Nag Panchami is observed few days after most states and this year it will be observed on August 8. In Andhra Pradesh, the puja is done just after Diwali. 

Nag Panchami 2020 date and timings

Nag Panchami Date: Saturday, 25 July 2020
Puja Muhurat: 05:39 AM to 08:22 AM
Duration: 2 Hours 44 minutes
Panchami Tithi begins at 02:34 PM on Jul 24, 2020
Panchami Tithi ends at-12:02 PM on Jul 25, 2020

(Source: drikpanchang.com)

Nag Panchami puja and vidhi

The main ritual is offering milk to the Nag Devta or the snake god. Offering milk to snakes is an old tradition in India on panchami tithi and it is said that the ritual keeps evil away. Many also observe fast on that day. Food made with milk as a key ingredient is also offered as prashad to the god. 

People are known to make snake idols with clay at home for puja. Milk, turmeric, kumkum and flowers are used for puja. Flowers and milk are also kept near the burrows and holes where snakes may be found. 

In India, devotees pray to several snake gods on Nag Panchami. Some among them are Ananta, Vasuki, Shesha, Padma, Kambala and Kaliya. 

It is not clear when exactly Naga Panchami started. Snakes have long been linked with many Gods in Hindu mythology. The 'snake with six heads' or 'Sheshnag' was the vehicle of Lord Vishnu and according to some scriptures, the world rests on the head of the Sheshnag.