Tamil Nadu Students Make Rs 15,000 Satellite, Possibly World's Smallest

The satellite, which can literally fit into the palm of one's hand, was made at a cost of just Rs 15,000 and weighs slightly lesser than a medium-sized egg.

 Share
EMAIL
PRINT
COMMENTS
Tamil Nadu Students Make Rs 15,000 Satellite, Possibly World's Smallest

The Rs 15,000 Jaihind-1S satellite can literally fit into the palm of one's hand

Chennai: 

A group of engineering students in Tamil Nadu have made a new experimental satellite which could set a new world record as the world's lightest and cheapest. The satellite, which can literally fit into the palm of one's hand, was made at a cost of just Rs 15,000 and weighs slightly lesser than a medium-sized egg. The satellite was developed by four first-year engineering students and is called the 'Jaihind-1S'. It can be used to gather data about weather conditions.

The Jaihind satellite, shaped like a small four-centimetre cube, will be launched from a NASA facility in August, according to news agency ANI. The Jaihind, which weighs a mere 33.39 grams, achieved its light weight as a result of the decision to 3D-print its outer casing.

According to news agency ANI, the 'Jaihind' will be flown on a balloon or rocketed up to the sky by August. After the balloon reaches the desired altitude, the satellite will disengage from the balloon and fall.

The 'Jaihind' has the capability of measuring 20 different weather parameters and recording four different parameters per second. It stores its data inside an in-built SD card.

It will also be used to test the durability of its 3D-printed Poly Lactic Acid (PLA) nylon material.

The sensor modules in the satellite will begin measuring parameters like saturated vapour pressure, actual vapour pressure, lapse rate, which helps us to study some more about weather conditions

Data from the 'Jaihind', which is stored in its inbuilt SD card, will be retrieved from it after it is recovered from its maiden ascent.

The sensor modules in the satellite will begin measuring parameters like saturated vapour pressure, actual vapour pressure, lapse rate,  which is used to study different weather conditions.

The satellite has been tested for a height of 40 feet and it was sent to NASA last week.

The 'Jaihind' was developed by first-year engineering students KJ Harikrishnan, P Amarnath, G Sudhi and T Giri Prasad, from the Hindustan Institute of Technology and Science in Kelambakkam near Chennai.

(With Inputs From ANI)

NDTV Beeps - your daily newsletter

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................

................................ Advertisement ................................