Convinced India-China Row Must Be Solved Through Diplomacy: S Jaishankar

S Jaishankar's comments come amid renewed tension between India and China over what the government has called new attempts by Beijing to change the status quo in certain areas in eastern Ladakh.

Convinced India-China Row Must Be Solved Through Diplomacy: S Jaishankar

S Jaishankar said the current period was "not the easiest of times" in the India-China relationship.

New Delhi:

The India-China border row has to be solved through diplomacy, External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar said on Thursday adding it was vital for both the countries to reach an "accommodation" not just for themselves, but the world as well.

"Our position there (in Ladakh) has been very clear - we have agreements and understandings with China. The agreements and understandings must be scrupulously observed by both parties," Mr Jaishankar was quoted as saying by news agency PTI.

"I am totally convinced that a solution to the situation has to be found in the domain of diplomacy. And I say that with responsibility," he said, underscoring that he was "not underplaying the seriousness of the current situation or the challenges" of the boundary question.

"The reality is what happens at the border will impact the relationship, you cannot separate it," he said, speaking at an online event for the launch of his book.

Describing the current period as "not the easiest of times" in the India-China relationship, Mr Jaishankar said that he had written the book "The India Way: Strategies For An Uncertain World'' before the Galwan Valley clash on June 15 in which 20 Indian soldiers lost their lives.

He also said India and China were two civilizational states who are going to enter the fourth industrial revolution when most other big civilizations did not make it.

The minister's comments come amid renewed tension between India and China over what the government has called new attempts by Beijing to change the status quo in certain areas in eastern Ladakh. The Indian Army said this week it had blocked Chinese troops in the most serious clash since June which itself was the worst violence between the two country in decades.

Tensions at the border are now at some of the highest levels since the 1962 war. Both sides have sent tens of thousands of troops to the region with India dispatching more since the weekend, according to news agency AFP.

Indian and Chinese military officers held a third day of emergency talks at the border Wednesday but no progress in easing tensions has been reported.

India accused Chinese forces of seeking to take more territory at the weekend, but its troops, including special forces, seized a number of hills that dominate a strategic valley.

China reacted with anger again Wednesday.

"Since the start of this year, India has repeatedly violated bilateral agreements and important consensus" on the frontier, foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said in Beijing.

"It has tried to unilaterally change the status quo by force, undermined the peace and stability of the border area, and caused tension in the border area. The responsibility is undoubtedly solely on the Indian side."

(With inputs from agencies)