Maha Navami 2019: Date, Puja Timing, Tithi, Muhurat, History, Significance - All You Need to Know

Maha Navami 2019: Maha Navami or Durga Navami will be observed from Sunday, October 6 and will extend into the afternoon of Monday, October 7, 2019. Maha Navami Tithi starts at 10:24 am on Sunday, October 6 and ends at 12:38 pm on Monday, October 7.

Maha Navami 2019: Date, Puja Timing, Tithi, Muhurat, History, Significance - All You Need to Know

Maha Navami 2019 or Durga Navami 2019 is observed and celebrated in honour of goddess Durga

New Delhi:

Maha Navami, also known as Durga Navami, is a festival that is celebrated on the ninth day of Navaratri (Sharada Navaratri) and the fourth/fifth day (depending on the Hindu calendar) of Durga Puja. Sharada Navaratri and Durga Puja are celebrated in honour of goddess Durga - the deity of shakti (strength). The holy festival is observed in the Hindu (lunisolar) calendar month of Ashvin, which typically falls in the Gregorian (solar) calendar months of September and October.

Maha Navami 2019 / Durga Navami 2019 - Date, Time, Muhurat And Tithi For Puja


Maha Navami or Durga Navami will be observed from Sunday, October 6 and will extend into the afternoon of Monday, October 7, 2019. The timings for puja or puja muhurat on Maha Navami 2019 are (All times are Indian Standard Time or IST):

  • Start Date and Time (Navami Tithi - Shukla Paksha): Sunday, October 6, 2019 at 10:54 am
  • Auspicious Times for Puja (Navami Puja Muhurats): 11:46 am to 12:33 pm (Oct 6), 14:07 pm to 14:54 pm (Oct 6), 17:50 pm to 18:14 pm (Oct 6), 23:45 pm (Oct 6) to 00:34 am (Oct 7), and 04:39 am to 05:28 am (Oct 7)
  • End Date and Time (Navami Tithi - Shukla Paksha): Monday, October 7, 2019 at 12:38 pm


Why Is Maha Navami (Durga Navami) Celebrated? A Brief History


Maha Navami (Mahanavami) or Durga Navami is celebrated as the victory of good over evil. It is the last day of battle between goddess Durga and demon Mahishasura. Maha Navami begins with Mahasnan (holy bath), followed by prayers to goddess Durga or Maa Durga. It is believed that on Maha Navami goddess Durga is worshipped as Mahisasuramardini - which literally means the slayer of the buffalo demon. On Maha Navami, Durga Maa made her final assault on demon Mahishasura, and the following morning, on Vijayadashami, triumphed over him. In fact, Vijayadashami gets derives its name from the Sanskrit and Hindi words Vijaya meaning victorious or triumphant, and Dashami, meaning tenth day. Vijayadashami is also celebrated as Dussehra, which too derives its name from the Sanskrit words Dush meaning bad or evil, and Hara which means defeating or destroying - thereby signifying the victory of good over evil.

What Is Ram Navami? How Is It Different From Maha Navami (Durga Navami)?
Ram Navami is the festival that celebrates the birth of Lord Ram. It is celebrated on the ninth day of Shukla Paksha (or bright phase of the lunar fortnight) in the month of Chaitra (mid-march) of the Hindu or lunisolar calendar. This typically occurs in the Gregorian solar calendar months of March or April every year.

Understanding Who Lord Ram (Lord Rama) Was:
According to India's ancient Hindu scriptures, the Lord (Vishnu - the preserver), through time, descends from his heavenly abode in his various incarnations or avatars, to show all the beings of the world the path of truth and righteousness; and to ensure that good triumphs over evil. Vishnu is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and is considered the supreme being in its Vaishnavism tradition. Vishnu is the 'preserver' of the universe in the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma (the 'creator' of the universe) and Shiva (the 'protector', or 'destroyer' of all evil). Lord Ram (Lord Rama) was an incarnation or avatar of Vishnu.

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The Significance Of Navaratri, Maha Navami (Durga Navami), Vijayadashami, And Dussehra:
In the eastern and northeastern states of India, Durga Puja is synonymous with Navaratri. In both festivals, goddess Durga battles and emerges victorious over the demon Mahishasura. In the northern and western states, the festival is synonymous with "Rama Lila" and Dussehra which celebrates the battle and victory of Lord Ram over the demon king Ravana. In the southern states, Dasara is celebrated as the victory of different goddesses (Goddess Chamundeshwari), and Lord Ram is celebrated. In all cases, the common theme is the battle and victory of good over evil.