150-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Skeleton Expected To Fetch $1.2 Million At Paris Auction

The dinosaur, which was first discovered in the 1990s in the US state of Wyoming, was initially restored in 2000 by palaeontologist Barry James.

150-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Skeleton Expected To Fetch $1.2 Million At Paris Auction

The skeleton is 2.10 metres (6.9 feet) tall and 5 metres (16.4 feet) long.

In the timeless quest to unlock the mysteries of Earth's ancient past, humanity has embarked on a remarkable journey through time, unearthing the remnants of colossal creatures that once roamed our planet. From the first tantalising discoveries in the 19th century to the thrilling excavations of today, palaeontology has continuously unveiled the astonishing secrets of dinosaurs. Now, a new chapter in this epic saga is set to unfold in the grandeur of an auction house in Paris as an unusually well-preserved dinosaur skeleton, a Camptosaurus named "Barry" that dates from the late Jurassic period, will go under the hammer in Paris next month.

According to Paris auction house Hotel Drouot, this Jurassic relic, dating back approximately 150 million years, stands over 6 feet tall and stretches 16 feet long.

The dinosaur, which was first discovered in the 1990s in the US state of Wyoming, was initially restored in 2000 by palaeontologist Barry James, from whom it got its name. The Italian laboratory Zoic, which acquired Barry last year, has further restored the skeleton.

Those with the deepest of pockets will have the chance to possess a genuine piece of Earth's history when this extraordinary specimen goes up for auction, with expectations soaring as high as $1.2 million.

"It is an extremely well-preserved specimen, which is quite rare," said Alexandre Giquello, from the Paris auction house Hotel Drouot, where the sale will take place.

"To take the example of its skull, the skull is complete at 90%, and the rest of the dinosaur's skeleton is complete at 80%," he said.

Dinosaur specimens on the art market remain rare, with no more than a couple of sales a year worldwide, Giquello said.

The public will have the opportunity to view the skeleton in mid-October, prior to its auction.

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