"Thought It Was An iPhone": Thieves Return Stolen Android Phone To Shocked US Couple

The woman said the encounter lasted only seconds, but turned her life upside down.

'Thought It Was An iPhone': Thieves Return Stolen Android Phone To Shocked US Couple

The woman said the encounter lasted only seconds.

In a bizarre incident, thieves in the US returned a phone they stole from a man because it wasn't an iPhone. According to ABC-affiliate KATV, the incident took place with a couple last month in Washington, DC. The woman told the outlet that she had just finished working "into the early morning hours" and her husband "insisted he meet her outside of their apartment" to park the car for her. When he was returning to the apartment after parking the vehicle, "two masked gentlemen" approached him and were armed with guns.

"They robbed him, took everything he had in his pockets, took the keys to my truck and got in and pulled off," she said.

While one of the robbers was in a BMW, the other one approached the couple on foot.

"They basically looked at that phone and was like 'Oh, that's an Android? We don't want this. I thought it was an iPhone'," she told KATV.

The woman said the encounter lasted only seconds, but turned her life upside down.

"That was my income. That was the way I made money. I did Uber Eats and Instacart so, that was our livelihood," she said.

In October, thieves stole $50,000 worth of goods from a Gucci store in California. In the video that surfaced on social media, a group of people wearing masks were seen entering the store and pushing the security guard. They hurriedly picked up the merchandise and left the store.

The police, citing CCTV footage, said the robbers stole purses and other valuables and the crime was executed in less than a minute.

A "preliminary" report by the Metropolitan Police a staggering 70 per cent increase in cases of robbery in Washington, DC, compared to last year. The statistics also showed homicide cases going up by 32 per cent in the same period and an increase of three per cent in cases of assault with dangerous weapon.

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