Doctors Discover Rare Vagina Stone In 27-Year-Old Lebanese Woman

The stone, which was the size of an orange, was present in the woman's pelvis.

Doctors Discover Rare Vagina Stone In 27-Year-Old Lebanese Woman

A large, round mass was found in her pelvic region.

In a shocking incident, doctors in Lebanon found a rare vagina store in a 27-year-old bedridden woman with cerebral palsy. The stone, which was the size of an orange, was present in the woman's pelvis, as per a report in Science Direct.

The case study was published in Urology Case Reports. It is to be noted that vaginal stones are often "misdiagnosed as bladder stones on plain radiography." They can be formed in two ways- when urine buildup in the vagina crystallizes or at a time when an untreated bacterial infection causes urine to harden. In this situation, there was no bacterial infection and urine stagnation was identified as the primary cause.

"Cerebral palsy is frequently associated with urinary incontinence and leads to constant leakage of urine into the vagina. In addition, the prolonged recumbent position results in urinary stasis, thus promoting stone formation," the journal stated.

The woman had a history of urinary incontinence and the symptoms were noticed three days before the woman was rushed to the emergency room. She was eating less than usual and looked pale and lethargic. Other symptoms included fever, chills, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Doctors examined the 27-year-old and performed a CT scan, which revealed a large, round mass in her pelvic region.

The woman had increased urine leakage as a result of the large development pressing on her bladder. Using ultrasonic shockwaves from a device applied to the woman's abdomen, medical professionals from Lebanese University in Beirut broke up the formation using laser treatment.

Further, doctors used forceps to remove the fragments in a three-hour procedure. She was later discharged and put on medicines.

The case study's authors recommend routine gynecologic checks for individuals with cerebral palsy, followed by an X-ray if stones are suspected, because these individuals are more likely to experience urine incontinence and, consequently, be at a higher risk of acquiring vaginal stones.

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