UK Asks Parents, Teachers To Contribute To Sex Education Curriculum

The UK government is asking parents, teachers and young people to help shape a new relationships and sex education curriculum that will help them stay safe and face the challenges of the modern world.

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UK Asks Parents, Teachers To Contribute To Sex Education Curriculum

The current statutory guidance for teaching Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) was introduced in 2000

London:  The UK government is asking parents, teachers and young people to help shape a new relationships and sex education curriculum that will help them stay safe and face the challenges of the modern world. The current statutory guidance for teaching Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) was introduced in 2000 and according to a statement from UK government, it currently fails to address risks to children which have grown in prevalence in recent years, including online pornography, sexting and staying safe online.

UK education secretary Justine Greening had earlier aannounced that sex and relationships education would be made compulsory in all schools in England and all primary and secondary schools must teach children about same-sex relationships and be "sensitive" to transgender issues.

According to the government, the statutory guidance is being updated after legislation was passed by Parliament earlier this year to make relationships education compulsory in all primary schools and relationships and sex education compulsory in all secondary schools.

As part of that process, an eight week call for evidence will invite views on age-appropriate content on mental wellbeing, staying safe online and LGBT issues in the updated subjects.

Earlier, the move to make RSE compulsory was welcomed by the teaching profession and organisations such as Barnardo's, Stonewall, the Catholic Education Service, NSPCC, Terrence Higgins Trust and the End Violence Against Women coalition.

"It is unacceptable that Relationships and Sex Education guidance has not been updated for almost 20 years especially given the online risks, such as sexting and cyber bullying, our children and young people face. Young people must have an education that teaches them the importance of healthy and stable relationships," said Education Secretary Justine Greening.

Ms Greening added that this call for evidence is about giving teachers, parents and especially young people a chance to help shape that new approach and I'd urge them to take part.
 
Currently only pupils attending local-authority run secondary schools - which represent around a third of secondary schools - are guaranteed to be offered Sex and Relationship Education as currently delivered.

The 'call for evidence' aims to gather views from people across England from all backgrounds on the content of this subject. It will look to establish what teachers think they should be teaching their pupils to help them navigate the modern world they are growing up in; how parents expect their children to be taught this topic in a safe and age-appropriate way; and what children themselves think they would benefit from understanding the most, and the online risks they are concerned with.

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(With Inputs from PTI)

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