Cambridge-Designed Curriculum To Teach Indian Students About Water Scarcity, Climate Activism

'Pani Pahar - the Water Curriculum', co-developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, is now available for students and teachers across India.

Cambridge-Designed Curriculum To Teach Indian Students About Water Scarcity, Climate Activism

The Water Curriculum has been co-developed by researchers at the Cambridge University

New Delhi:

'Pani Pahar - the Water Curriculum', co-developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, is now available for students and teachers across India.

The curriculum originated from 'Pani, Pahar- Waters of the Himalayas' a collaborative research project between the University of Cambridge, The Centre for Ecology Development and Research in India (CEDAR) and Southasia Institute for Advanced Studies in Nepal (SIAS).

The research project explored the changing landscapes and escalating water crises in the Indian Himalayas.

The curriculum will help students understand water resources, sustainability, and how these are affected by climate change. The lessons have been planned in a way to help students reflect on and research the human causes of water scarcity and effects of environmental change of humans and our shared resources.

The curriculum will also help students to understand activism, recognize some of the challenges associated with activism, and associate activism with the needs specific to their school.

"These school materials are designed to allow young people, who are highly mobilised through the school strikes for climate, to develop a critical engagement with these issues, with learning resources and educational materials that are targeted at different stages of the secondary school curriculum," said Professor Bhaskar Vira, who was part of the academic research team.

The curriculum has been developed for students aged between 9 and 15. The curriculum has three sets, one for each level, each involving a 10-hours contact time with the students. The curriculum is targeted at students of junior, middle and senior level. It was launched in India this week, but Professor Vira contends that it can easily be adopted for any other country.

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