How To Explain A Gap Year On Your Resume

Priscilla Claman writes for HBR Ascend that depending on the situation a job applicant can explain their gap year to their advantage.

How To Explain A Gap Year On Your Resume

Priscilla Claman writes on how to address a gap year on your resume

New Delhi:

Looking for a job in itself is a challenging task, but it gets more difficult if there's a gap year or two on your resume. Given the changing face of recruitment process where recruiters scout for currently employed individuals using technology and on social media, it can be difficult for those who took a sabbatical from job to get noticed.

So how does one explain the gap on their resume without losing their chance at being recruited.

Priscilla Claman writes for HBR Ascend that depending on the situation a job applicant can explain their gap year to their advantage.

To make it simpler, she has elaborated with some examples on how to explain a gap in employment.

If you took time off to take care of Children or a sick relative

One common objection in such situations is that the employee may again desert the company for family matters.

In such a case, a prospective employee should stress that they have arranged their family matters so that they could focus on their career.

In such situations she also advises not to get into too many details and keep the discussion at minimum. She says that the more you get into details about your family, the more is the chance to give the interviewer something to object on.

If you are a college graduate

A common objection in this situation is that the company will have to spend time and resources in training the employee.

In such cases, Ms. Claman says that it would be helpful to mention any experience the job applicant has had on their resume. She emphasizes that it is important to be factually correct and list out any practical skills the candidate may have.

If you are a post-entrepreneur, whether your business succeeded or failed

Ms. Claman says that in such cases one of the objections is that the employee would abandon the company the next chance they get of setting their own business.

She says that this can be a tough nut to crack. For someone in this situation, it would be wise to look for any contractual opportunities first and then build on the experience.

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